Heck Of A Bunch: Strawberry Shortcake: Snowberry Days - # ...Is “Bottleshock” a Toddler’s Painting Or Classic Art?
Have you ever been having a wonderful bottle of champange after which a fellow dinner guest says it’s “a bit tart”, or “Lemony Snicket’s a Series of Unfortunate Events Dvd bit heavy”, or “it tastes like vinegar?”
In my view this is partly why wine so fascinating. Assessing it happens in the subjective, emotional section of the brain. That’s why one guy could get pumped up about an expensive Sauvignon Blanc while his mate thinks it’s best used in the salad dressing.
This seems to happen in a very lot inside the art world. The “work of genius” you’re keen on and admire might create another individual wonder issues lost your marbles.
I once took my partner Bridget to view Bottleshock, a feature film dramatizing the “Judgment of Paris” wine tasting of 1976 that pitched top wines from California from the equally great wines from France. The movie combines ale movie making with the skill of wine making.
In my personal there have been only a couple of notable features. I love the Napa Valley and discovered the art direction of the filming quite outstanding. Then there were Rachael Taylor whose artful looks just combined with the stunning landscape.
Why one thing films about wine always seem so schmaltzy? The Oscar for wine movie schmaltz will have to head to Keanu Reeves looking for A Walk inside the Clouds. I think Bottleshock does an excellent job of continuing the schmaltz tradition.
The fate of some bottles of Chardonnay inside movie (I won’t go into details for anxiety about ruining it for you) is one area I haven’t run into in winemaking before! And when they showed the wine being loaded to the Paris flight, I thought air travelers will need to have been much friendlier than today!
To keep things in perspective, let’s consider the upside. Alan Rickman, cast as Steven Spurrier, plays an excellent wine snob. I also enjoyed individuals who stumbled on as really loving their work and felt the film captured this well.
The general feeling I took from the film, however, was that the acting was stiffer compared to a wooden post. In fact, there was probably more wood in the acting than you’d find inside a wine barrel! And schmaltz reined supreme in some parts. To use wine snob jargon, Bottleshock was flaccid, flowery and lacking in structure.
On one other hand Trevor, a great friend of mine, ADORED the movie. Trevor doesn’t have almost anything to do with wine other than buying and drinking it (very keenly I might add). He said he’d place Bottleshock as one of the better films he’s seen, with his fantastic son seemed to be totally enraptured by it!
It’s clear we have distinctly different perspectives for this film so I’ll leave you to choose. It’s different from Sideways in that it’s not as pessimistic or packed with testosterone fueled, boyish wine behavior. Bottleshock doesn’t eliminating the niche for Merlot either! So, would you rate it a show stopper or even a spittoon receptacle?
For your interest, Trev with his fantastic son may have loved it but his wife & daughter only lasted twenty minutes before they decided it wasn’t for the children and walked out!